Posts tagged 4c's

I hate my engagement ring, what now?

What!!! You hate your engagement ring? Well I have news for you if this is the case you are not alone. Statistics show, and I don’t have any to hand, that not everyone loves their engagement ring once they set eyes on it. The reason for this is simple and it’s probably to do with the fact that he chose it based on what he thought you’d like. Or worse still, and this is true, he asked your best friend.

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Now if you’re wondering why you wouldn’t like it after your best friend was consulted, then let me explain. It could well be a jealousy thing or it could be that she feels that as best friends you have the same taste in everything.  I’ve had it before with a few clients. The best friend gets carried away and feels that because she would want a princess cut diamond you would too. And because she likes modern, she feels thats what you want too. To be fair, it is difficult to pick out the exact correct ring if it’s all being kept a secret, however sometimes ladies, dropping a few hints would do you the world of good. And men, pay attention to the hints. After all it’s your money and you would want to get it right. Yet with that said, even the best laid plans can go wrong. If the ring hasn’t been tried on, it could well be a case of the ring is perfect but it just doesn’t suit her hand. 

So now what? What are the solutions to having the ring of your dreams? Well I’ve heard it said that you only really need to “wear” it until you are married and then it is your perogoative to have it changed. There is also no one saying that you have to wear it all the time. You can pick and chose and swap and change between the wedding and the engagement ring. Some guys think that you should just wear it and be grateful.  I don’t go along with that. I believe jewellery is meant to be worn and enjoyed.

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If you decide to keep quiet about it then perhaps the opportune moment to have it changed is when you go to pick your wedding bands. When you are with the jeweller you can ask for a style of ring that you want and if it doesn’t fit in with the engagement ring than perhaps the engagement ring can be altered or amended in such a way so as not to upset the guy. The bottom line is that the way you deal with this scenario will forge your relationship for years to come. He has probably spent a lot more time on this than you think, and from what I have witnessed over the years, spent a little more than he thought he would. Be sensitive to his emotions. Diplomacy is key and yes I believe you should tell him, just not during the proposal. 

If you have been the fortunate recipient of an engagement ring that you unfortunately don’t like then please get in touch with me.  A fair bit of my work as a bespoke jeweller is remaking and remodelling rings. I have my own workshop and create all pieces by hand.  You can view a selection of my work by clicking the links below. I would be delighted to sit down with you both and run through some options. The most expensive part of the engagement ring is the diamond. It is also the most sentimental part. Over time the ring will and does wear down and would need to be remade. There is no saying that time can’t be now. 

If you would like an appointment, or you would like Lewis to speak at your event, then please do call for a free consultation in our central London Hatton Garden office and we would be glad to try and help you. Our details are on the main page of the Joseph Sterling website.

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook - Twitter - and Instagram.
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

What questions should you ask when buying a ring, and what can you expect from Joseph Sterling?

As the old joke goes, the definition of mixed emotions is seeing your mother in law drive YOUR prized Aston Martin off a cliff…

Well let’s look at the same bag of mixed emotions, yet this time the setting for the story is your engagement. 

You are super excited as you’ve just got engaged, it’s an emotional time. The proposal was as romantic as you dreamt it to be, the flash mob sung out your favourite song, and the task in hand now is to go shopping for that all important engagement ring. You’ve suddenly been thrust into adulthood. For most of us, this is probably the third highest purchase we will make in a lifetime, behind a car and a property. It’s now time to go to the local jewellers, be it in a small town centre, shopping centre, or even stroll the jewellery quarter of London which is Hatton Garden. Although first stop will always be to search online.

This is when the other emotions start to kick in. When the questions arise and when, for some, tears start to flow, and that’s just the men!


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Let’s use Hatton Garden as an example. I know it well it’s where my office is. Try to picture the scene. You get off the tube at either Farringdon or Chancery Lane, and suddenly you are confronted with over 80 different retails stores all side by side, and most of them selling around 80 percent of what their neighbour is selling. This is the theme all down the road. To start with you are delighted and excited. Slowly after the fourth or fifth shop you start to get tired, you start to wonder why what seems to be the same ring in the previous four shops has so many different prices. You start to wonder why one retailer tells you one thing yet the next retailer contradicts what the previous one said. You stress, panic and decide to leave it for today. You get home with your fiancé and look online and you’re bombarded with even more information, yet this time you don’t just have the independent retailer to contend with, you have the whole of the world wide web too. 

The man starts to wonder if he would have been better off purchasing something then surprising his then girlfriend with a ring to avoid all the stress and pressure, and the lady thinks she should have gone with her instinct and purchased from the first shop they went into. 

Now then, let’s see if I can help you make things go a little easier. I am going to give you some essential tips I believe will help remove the fear factor when looking for your dream engagement ring and what you can expect from Joseph Sterling, a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). If you haven’t heard of the LDB then click here to find out who they are. 


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There are lots of “lists” online from different websites showing you lots of diamonds which on the face of it look cheaper on a like for like basis. I wish it was that simple. There are so many other characteristics and factors to take into consideration when buying a diamond, you can’t just rely on the 4c’s anymore. One factor with these websites is that the list price doesn’t include VAT. Another is that if the company is outside of the UK, then you will probably also have import duty to pay. You see to really understand a diamond and to see why one is more expensive than another, you need to view it. You need to see where in the stone the inclusions are. You need to have a 3D look at the diamond. This is something you can’t tell from the certificate. How much “life” is the diamond giving off. What is its lustre like? Only by handling the diamond can you see this and only then will you understand why one diamond is higher priced than another on a like for like basis. 

Ask to see comparable stones for the same budget you have. Try to see if they all have a similar thickness to the stone. You don’t want one too thick and you also don’t want one too shallow. If so the light is not dispersed correctly. You want to be able to see a nice kaleidoscope of colours. The optimum spread for a one carat round diamond is 6.5mm in diameter. 

Ask if this stone comes with a GIA certificate. GIA are considered the Rolls Royce of diamond graders in the world. Ask to use a loop (jewellers eyeglass) to see your potential stone and don’t be embarrassed to ask where the inclusion is if you can’t find it. 

Most importantly, don’t allow yourself to feel pressured into buying a diamond from that supplier there and then. At Joseph Sterling we are always prepared to put it aside for you and let you take a day or two to consider it. After all I would want that option, and I believe in treating my clients how I would like to be treated. 

So you’ve picked your diamond, you are happy and now comes the phase of designing the ring. Ideally you want to speak with someone who will be making your ring themselves. Too often jewellers say they do this, yet outsource to another workshop. This has two pitfalls. Firstly you don’t get to speak to the person making your ring, and therefore if the diamond dealer forgets to convey one small point about some detailing you want, the ring will go back and forth. And second you are paying more to have your ring made as the dealer more often than not will add some commission for himself. At Joseph Sterling all the jewellery we make for our clients is made in house in our own workshops which we are more than happy to show our clients.

So the question I would like to leave you with is this. When would you like to come in for an appointment? 

If you would like an appointment, then please do call for a free consultation in our central London Hatton Garden office and we would be glad to try and help you. Our details are on the main page of the Joseph Sterling website.

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook - Twitter - and Instagram.
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

Diamonds and Cocktails the perfect combination.

Last Thursday evening the scene was set. Myself and fifty women were in the loft of the lovely venue which is The Hospital Club. The theme for the evening was diamonds and cocktails and I was invited along to give my knowledge and experience in the diamond world to the select invited  ladies as part of the Morrison and Foerster networking evening for their employees and clients. 


It was a glamourous evening arranged by Marie Carey. She is in charge of the company’s marketing department here in the UK, and what a good job she did. 

On tap there was plenty of champagne and cocktails which flowed all night and  everyone was dressed up and was wearing their most glamourous jewels. 

Arrival time was set for 7pm and I was on stage around 7:45. In my brief with Marie, she asked how long I wanted to speak for and how long she thought would be reasonable to speak for. We both decided around 20-30 minutes would be perfect. Now that’s all well and good when someone is preparing a PowerPoint presentation or just “giving a talk”. However that wasn’t the case this evening and it’s not really how I do things. I like to engage. I like to make the audience feel included and I like to make everyone feel like I’m talking just to them. So here’s how it went.

So I started off with around 6-7 minutes with a brief but detailed bio of myself, what I do, how I got into the business, and how I add value to the industry, then invite questions. This is when things start to become interactive and people start to feel included. We had some serious questions like: 
Where do I see the future of the diamond industry? 
How do I get the best value for money diamond?
Is it worth investing in diamonds? 
How do I avoid buying a blood diamond?

All the way through to:
What’s the best way to sell my old diamond jewellery?
How can you spot a fake from a real diamond? 
How can I get a man to spend more than three months salary on my engagement ring?
What’s the best way to insure my jewellery?


So as you can see there was a lot of variety during the evening. I glanced at Marie a few times expecting her to tell me to wrap it up, however she kept gesticulating to continue. All in all I was discussing the fascinating world of diamonds for an hour and a half, and we could have kept going all night. 

I want to publicly thank Marie for her efforts and for asking me to talk. It was my pleasure. I look forward to seeing you again soon. 

If you would like to hear me speak at one of your events, then please be in touch. You never know, it could be the sparkle your evening desires.

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook and Twitter
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

Mining through the fields of selling your diamond jewellery

This week alone I’ve seen six people who wanted to sell me their unwanted diamond jewellery, and a number of these were diamond engagement rings. I’d like to share one client’s particular circumstance with you here to highlight the pitfalls you may encounter when the time comes to sell your unwanted jewellery.

Let me tell you the story…

This particular client came to see me to sell her jewellery after reading my blog post "How Do I Sell My Diamond Ring and Other Diamond Jewellery" on my website. In there I explain some methods of how to sell your diamonds, and also which methods to avoid.

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She had a 1.50ct round diamond engagement ring with a diamond grading certificate and a valuation report and wanted to sell it for personal reasons.

Correctly Valuing a Stones Worth

The stone was originally purchased for £9000. It was grossly over valued for insurance at £21,000.  The lady in question, said she was expecting to receive close to the valuation mark - sadly completely unrealistic considering the true value of the stone.   

The diamond had a certificate from an independent lab, however it wasn’t from a reputable company that is widely recognised within the trade. After comparing it to certified diamonds from the GIA, who are world renowned, it was evident that this was not what was suggested on the report. 

The outcome

The diamond was determined by myself and another colleague in the London Diamond Bourse as being lower by two grades in both the colour and clarity and the stone had a terrible spread which wasn’t even mentioned in the report.  All these factors lead to the diamonds true worth being just one third of what was paid originally by the client to the retailer they purchased the ring from. In the end, the client settled for a third of the original price paid.  

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Lessons to learn from this story

Firstly, to accurately secure the value of your stone always get it certified by a world renowned diamond certification body.  Joseph Sterling prides itself in selling and trading GIA certified diamonds.

Secondly, have it accurately valued for insurance regularly so that if and when you do want to sell back your jewellery you have a much more realistic idea of what it is worth.  Joseph Sterling offers accurate valuation services for all your jewellery.  Jewellery should be re-valued every three years.  

Making sure you are aware of these potential pitfalls will hopefully result in less disappointment when the time comes to sell on your unwanted jewellery.

If you do have any diamonds or other jewellery to sell, then please do call us for a free consultation in our central London office and we would be glad to help you. Our details are on the main page of the Joseph Sterling website.

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook and Twitter
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

For love… or money. Why do we buy diamonds?

Diamonds are eternally fascinating. They can also be a good investment if you know how to cut the right deal, says jewellery expert Lewis Malka.

 

Have you ever wondered why there is no way to buy diamonds on the stock market? You can buy almost anything else – sugar, gold, orange juice, part of a football club – but you can’t buy diamonds anywhere.

There is a reason. If you are thinking of buying a diamond, you have to examine it carefully. The first thing you’re assessing is The Four Cs: cut, carat, clarity and colour. Each of these is vital. Take clarity, for example. The diamond’s internal characteristics include features such as clouds, cavities, graining, laser lines and much else. These are often known as ‘inclusions’. Which inclusions a diamond has, and where, makes a big difference to the price. You also have to consider the symmetry, fluorescence, proportions and much else. An impossible task without carefully viewing it in person.

People increasingly ask me about purchasing diamonds as an investment. Their first question is usually, “Will I get a better return than I do on cash in the bank?” The short answer is no. If you buy a significant diamond ring from any high street jeweller, it will probably take you 25-30 years to make your money back on it.

The only sensible way to purchase diamonds as an investment is to go to a reputable diamond trader, who might sell you a diamond at the wholesale price. We all know about the dangers of using past performance as a guide to the future, but the wholesale price of diamonds has increased by between 5% and 15% every year since records began in the 1970s. My advice is that it’s probably better to spend your budget on one larger stone than two or three smaller ones. The larger a diamond, the rarer it is. As with most things, rarity makes for a better investment.

Coloured diamonds are rarer still, and we have seen yellows, browns, greens and reds coming onto the market recently. These will command an even higher price and should make a profit more quickly. Our records show that these have gone up in recent times by as much as 30% year on year.

24.78ct natural pink diamond. Amazing!! 

Pink diamonds are the rarest of all. In November 2010, Laurence Graff bought a 24.78 carat rectangular pink diamond at auction for £29million. You probably won’t be surprised to hear that this was the most ever paid for a diamond. When he was asked why he paid so much, Mr Graff replied: “To reduce my tax bill this year.” Diamonds can be almost magically beautiful, but investing in them remains a hard-headed decision.

 

 

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook and Twitter
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

www.joseph-sterling.com | lewis@Joseph-sterling.com

When I Grow Up I Want To Be A Jeweller

One of the most common questions I get asked, other than “Where did you get your good looks from?” is “Have you always wanted to be a jeweller?”

The short answer is no. However how I did become a jeweller and how this happened was a bit by chance. 

Traditionally most jewellers in Hatton Garden, the jewellery centre of the UK, are in the business because it has been in the family for a few generations. The tradition of bringing your children into your business is something which happened quiet a lot years ago. Not so much anymore. As in most industries, things are getting harder and harder.

My son at work with me in the London Diamond Bourse:

I was 16 years old when I was first introduced to the back end of the jewellery industry. A friend of my parents was a manufacturing jeweller, and wanted to know if I was interested in helping out for a few weeks in the summer holidays. I was intrigued by the offer and accepted. I was fascinated by what I saw. The attention to detail and the intricate work involved was mesmerising for me. Working with some of the most precious gemstones and metals on earth was something I wanted to do. My mind was set. This was for me. 

After 2 weeks of what can only be described as a great summer job, I looked into starting a course in jewellery making, and found one which was starting that term at Sir John Cass School of Arts. It was an apprenticeship course and they assisted in finding me work placement too. I loved it. Learning everything I could. From soldering to sawing, filing to buffing, polishing to setting, casting to bending. All my friends were doing A level exams and then off for a gap year. Not me. This was it. 

I was fortunate for the college to find me a guy called Laurence who, with his father, ran a wholesale company making 18ct and platinum ring mounts, as well as bespoke pieces by hand. I spent a total of 9 years with Laurence, the person I owe a lot to for my career path, then decided to move on and go on my own. 

Some shots of procedures used in making jewellery in my workshop:

In the year 2000 I founded and started Joseph Sterling Bespoke Jewellers, and focused my business on creating bespoke pieces for private clients. The best way, and in my opinion the only way, to do this is to create a network of people who can, and will, happily refer clients to me. I joined BNI and have been a member ever since. 

In 1999 I took a gemmology course and passed. Learnt so much that all it did was fill me with a desire to learn more. Diamonds are one of those things I am fascinated by. The fact that something so small has such beauty and lustre to command such a high price is extraordinary.

I joined the London Diamond Bourse in 2007 and a few years later was invited onto the board, and to this day I proudly sit as a board member as part of an 11 person strong committee. The fact that I have a say in the future of the diamond industry and can make suggestions to improve and evolve with society excites me. 

If you do have any jewellery ideas you would like made bespoke, then please do call for a consultation in our central London office and we would be glad to try and help you. Our details are on the main page of the Joseph Sterling website.

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook and Twitter
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

Getting Engaged? Thinking Of A Proposal? Top 10 Most Creative Engagement Ideas

Alongside Valentines Day, Christmas is the most popular time of year to get engaged, it is also one of the most popular times of year to get married. 

Picture the scene, the decorations are all up, the family is all gathered, everyone is in a celebratory mood, BANG!! Good to go!!! Well that’s saved a few quid, and if you can use that towards her dream engagement ring, then all the better :)

So now the big question becomes “How” are you going to propose?  Here are my top ten Christmas proposal ideas which may help you decide on the “how”. Let me know your thoughts, or indeed let me know if I’ve missed any out :)

  1. Hire an excellent pilot that can do writing in the sky. Take her to a favorite spot, sit back and relax while the plane fly’s in writing Merry Christmas, will you marry me. Too extravagant?
  2. Stage a treasure hunt. Start by placing “clues” all around the room, or all around the house.  Each clue could lead to a bunch small “gifts” that symbolise fun things you’ve done together, or plan to do together. The final gift will be the ring box that is hidden safely in your pocket! As she follows the clue and pulls it out of your pocket, drop to one knee and say, “Will you marry me?”
  3. See if you can convince your local radio DJ to get in on the proposal. Have them play her favorite song, and then the DJ could call her on the phone and say, so and so loves you and would love to marry you. All this can happen live on the radio.
  4. The wishing well: Find a wishing well somewhere romantic and set up a romantic scenario. Make a nice sign, throw a coin down, reel up the sign just like in the picture. 
  5. Surprise at work?? While she is at work, send her flowers with a card attached professing your love to her. An hour later send a Christmas package to her containing the ring, and be standing outside her door when she opens it, pop around the corner and ask her to marry you.
  6. Dress up as Santa. When you make your grand entrance as Santa Claus, have a bag with “toys” inside. Instead of giving her toys or a candy cane, reach inside and pull out her engagement ring. Santa on bended knee will make great photos!
  7. Take her to see her favorite sports game (or yours). During half time ask the announcer to call out her name telling her how much so and so loves you and would love you to become his wife. This will melt her heart on the spot. And get a good applause from the rest of the stadium.
  8. Take a drive through her favorite part of the country. Stop at a beautiful overlook; tell her how you feel about her and what you want your lives to be like a few years from now. Then pop the question on her.
  9. Wrap yourself up as a present. There are lots of fun ways you could do this. You could hide yourself inside a big box (with air holes) and then surprise the daylights out of her when she opens up the box! Or you could have fun with it and make it obvious that you’re a self-wrapped gift. Let her unwrap you, and when she gets most of the way through all the wrapping, surprise her with the ring.
  10. Finally… Do it the day after Christmas… the reason I say that is because Christmas is already a special day, so you should do it on a day that can be special to the both of you as a couple. A day that doesn’t have anything else attached to it, like a holiday.

If you do have any jewellery ideas you would like made bespoke, then please do call for a consultation in our central London office and we would be glad to try and help you. Our details are on the main page of the Joseph Sterling website.

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook and Twitter
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

How to create a masterpiece of diamond jewellery

Roses aren’t the only beautiful objects which come in pink, gold and sapphires do too, and thats exactly what my latest creation is made using. Let me walk you through it.

(Here we see the components I made for this particular ring and of course the 2.50ct)

The brief was to re-make an engagement ring using the clients original diamond. In this case I am referring to the 2.50ct Asscher cut diamond. She, Helen, had seen a ring elsewhere and wanted me to make the same ring but with some slight alterations to fit her diamonds dimensions. Helen also wanted to use rose gold as she wanted her ring to be unique and different. When using a white diamond in the centre of a ring, I always recommend that the setting be made of a naturally white metal. The only metal conforming to this is platinum. Helen agreed. 

(The ring is now assembled and ready for the stones to be set)

Helen wanted some shoulder stones which would compliment both the diamond in the centre and also the rose gold the shank is made of. After browsing some of my designs on my website, we decided not to use traditional white diamonds pave on the shoulders, but instead pink sapphires. Helen was so excited by this, she instructed me to commence immediately. 

(The finished piece in all it’s glory. A diamond ring with pink sapphire shoulders)

The reaction from Helen when done was brilliant. I couldn’t have hoped for a better one. She loved it really loved it. She couldn’t have been happier. The photo doesn’t really do it justice to the colour of the shank, but I assure you, the pink in the metal with the pink of the stones is stunningly beautiful. Or should I say, a real masterpiece. 

If you do have any jewellery ideas you would like made bespoke, then please do call for a consultation in our central London office and we would be glad to try and help you. Our details are on the main page of the Joseph Sterling website.

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook and Twitter
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

How do I Sell My Diamond Ring And Other Diamond Jewellery

Most advertising campaigns by De Beers feature their famous slogan “A Diamond is Forever.” Consequently, women rarely sell a diamond and often feel uncomfortable buying diamonds previously owned by other women. There is a sentimental aspect to diamonds that is the very opposite from other tangible assets like boats, houses or cars. However, there are times when people need to sell their diamonds and, unlike the used car market, there is not a well-developed method for consumers to sell their diamonds.

As a consumer, you face some difficult challenges maybe not faced before when trying to get the best price for your diamond in a safe and comfortable manner. The starting point is to know exactly what you are selling. This is much easier if the diamond has a grading certificate from a major laboratory like the GIA, HRD or EGL. You have a better opportunity if there is a formal grading report. In the instance you don’t have one, you should find an independent evaluator who can determine the diamond and assess its quality and possible value.

Once you know your diamond’s specifications, you can find the up to date retail asking price by ascertaining with online retailers to see what similar diamonds are selling for in today’s retail market. It is unlikely you will be able to get the going retail price for your diamond. Selling your diamond at 80% to 90% of that amount would make it sell faster. Be realistic and honest about your expectations. The lowest cost online retailers, not the expensive jewellery shops with double the price, set the value of your diamond.

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You now know your target price and simply have to decide how to find the correct buyer for your diamond. There are several possibilities available to sell your diamond and you need to decide which is best for maximising your money and safety while minimizing your time and effort.

Your first idea might be to travel to the nearest jewellery shop or pawnshop and sell them the diamond. The key to remember here is that they do not need your diamond. They can get all the diamonds they want at wholesale prices from their suppliers. The only reason they will buy your diamond is if the price is a fraction of the wholesale price. They hope you need the money desperately enough to take 25%-50% of what you could be getting for your diamond elsewhere. They might offer you a little more if you “upgrade” to something they have in their stock. However, this often results in you paying more for the new diamond and receiving less for your diamond than if you sold it elsewhere.

Several online brokers specialize in buying diamonds and estate jewellery from consumers. They typically have you ship the diamond to them so they can determine the amount they will pay you. Pretty much like the cash for gold scandal. All too often, this amount is much less than their preliminary estimate so you must either pay the return postage, or accept their price. If your main priority is getting money fast, this is a valid option. If your main priority is getting top dollar for your diamond, there are better selling methods available to you.

Auctions like eBay are very common for selling jewellery items but there is so much low quality jewellery listed, it is hard for potential buyer to find your quality diamond. You are competing with jewellery retailers whose entire business is selling on eBay so they are experts at writing the descriptions (often with exaggerated quality), taking impressive pictures and shipping their items. Even if a bidder does find your item, the odds of getting your target price are slim to nil because other retailers are advertising items with similar descriptions for about half the amount you want. Notice I did not say they are advertising similar quality, just similar descriptions. Do a search for diamond rings with GIA grading reports and you will see the vast majority of diamond rings have paperwork from sources you have never heard of before.

Other effective ways to find a buyer are classified ads in local newspapers and bulletin boards at church or work. The challenge is reaching enough people to find at least one buyer willing to pay your price. You have to be careful when doing this kind of transaction, especially if selling to a stranger. Do the transaction in a safe place and be sure you have a valid form of payment. You do not want to hand over your diamond and end up with a phoney cheque or counterfeit pound notes.

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Some jewellery shops and online retailers will sell your diamond on consignment. Online retailers with a local presence have an advantage in that they have large numbers of diamond shoppers on their website plus walk in traffic that can see your diamond in person. They also have lower overhead and prices so you can get a bigger share of the selling price. With jewellery shops often marking up prices over 100%, your share is likely to be less than half of the selling price.

Be sure to get a written description of the item you are giving on consignment and the minimum amount you will accept for your diamond. All too often sellers are not being able to get their jewellery items back from a store or only receive a fraction of the amount they expected from the sale. However, if you have patience and a low priced, trustworthy retailer to broker your diamond, you have an excellent chance of getting an excellent price for your diamond without the hassle and safety issues of selling it yourself.

If you do have any diamonds or other jewellery to sell, then please do call us for a free consultation in our central London office and we would be glad to try and help you. Our details are on the main page of he Joseph Sterling website.

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook and Twitter
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.

European Professional Women and the Diamond Geezer.

Last Thursday evening was a night to remember. In the heart of London’s famous Soho district, in a swanky cocktail bar called Archer’s, there was an event going on like no other. Previously unattended by men, Lewis Malka, the Diamond Geezer from Joseph Sterling Bespoke Jewellers, was giving a talk on diamonds to members and guests of the European Professional Women’s Network.  

Billed as an evening of networking, sparkles and bubbles, the event lived up to it’s name. 

For the first time in their event history, the EPWN were sold out!! Entrepreneurs who I had the pleasure of meeting had come from all different countries, including Italy, Spain, France, and Germany to mention but a few. What was meant to be a 20 minute educational slot by me, turned into an hour of interactive Q&A’s which was delivered with humour and fact in a way that  made the time fly. Topics included the 4C’s, Conflict Diamonds, Re-Modeling antique Jewellery and always a controversial one, Should a woman buy her own engagement ring!!

On show last night was a range of diamonds which attendees were allowed to get up close and personal with :)

"This was my first time at an EPWN event and if they are all this good I am definatley joining up" said one lady I spoke with after the talk. Another said "I have never been as interest in diamonds as I am now. There is no way I am going to wait for my husband to buy me diamonds. I am going to buy my own from now on". 

"What the evening did was allow lots of people to come together in a relaxed atmosphere to enjoy some champagne and time with one of natures natural wonders. It’s not everyday we all get so close to these beauties and with some much to learn and know, it was a pleasure to have Lewis come and speak to our members and guests of the EPWN". That was a quote from event organiser Laurence Rose.

Would you like me to speak at your event? Drop me an email. It would be a pleasure. 

Lewis Malka is a recognized expert in making diamond rings as well as being a famous jeweller to the stars. All his blogs are his own opinions. He is a member of the London Diamond Bourse (LDB). You can follow him daily on Facebook and Twitter
If you would like any bespoke jewellery made, then please visit his website.